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20121121
20121129
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
. my college -- public institution that serves the inner-city section of york -- did away with rotc about 16 years after i graduated because of the vietnam war. they have decided to bring it back this year. [applause] >> i want to leave you with one story and one thought. i was in minnesota. they have the military appreciation fund. they collect money for rehab, college, and other things. it unifies the entire state. the speaker was a mother of a national guardsman who had gone three times to iraq. she is a big executive at the target corporation. she did not want to be involved with her son's activities. she went off to see him often. she was named the chair of the parents left behind. look at the young mothers with their children who were crying because her daddy had gotten on the airplane. she thought she owed it to her son and her country into the sun people. she gave me the most haunting line i have never heard -- i quickly learned when you are a military mother, you go home and draw the lines on the window that looked out across the driveway. you cannot bear the idea of the mi
. it started in a small town or city or neighborhood like you know when a young person got the feeling that they should enter the service. sometime it is because their father, grandfather, uncle, or brother served. sometimes it was just an idea they got. sometimes they get the complete support of their community. sometimes they do it over and some of the protest and concerns of friends and family. sometimes they have tried college or work and it did not work out. once they join the military, it is a completely different life from anything you have done. it is never like with the recruiter tells you. [laughter] you get there and immediately the service wants to make you a service member -- a soldier, sailor. they trust you differently. they have to learn a different language. they are trying to make you part of a team. it is all being part of the team. the team is one important than the individual. from the beginning of basic training and advanced training and when they are sent to their first unit, they are always in groups. they are part of that. they are assigned to a permanent force
destabilized last year, aq ap took control of several key cities in the south of yemen. in the months since, their advances have been largely reversed through a renewed and even more effective partnership with yemen's new government. our work in yemen is far from done. dismantling them, eliminating it as a threat to the united states will ultimately require sustained pressure, more u.s. training and assistance, close partnership with the government and people of yemen and political support for transition. another country we have made good progress is somalia. for years -- when i became director of the c.i.a., it was obvious that somalia was a failed state. the failed state where the militant group controlled large pieces of territory. declared allegiance to al qaeda and brought about a humanitarian crisis and planned attacks in the region. but there, too, we have seen significant progress. in large part because of an effective partnership between the united states and the african union mission in somalia. the result of these efforts is an al shabaab that has lost 50% of the territory it hel
and its aftermath. it has been a very challenging time for new york city. i think you have shown quite a bit of fortitude in coming back and getting back to business. my remarks today are going to focus on the reasons for the disappointingly slow pace of economic recovery in the united states, and the policy actions that have been taken by the federal open market committee to support the economy. in addition, i will discuss important economic challenges our country faces as we close out 2012 and move into 2013, in particular the challenge of putting federal government finances on a sustainable path and the longer run while avoiding actions that would endanger the economic recovery in the near term. the economy is continuing to recover from the financial crisis and recession, but the pace of the recovery has been slower than fomc participants and others had hoped or anticipated when i spoke here last, three years ago. indeed, since the recession trough in 2009, growth in real gdp has averaged only a little more than 2% per year. similarly, the job market has improved over the past three
, is right at the center of this storm. so that's the city of sacramento. perhaps 100,000 or more people in serious gemdy. should a levee break and those levees are not up to 200-year standards, should a levee break in that region, people would have less than 20 minutes to find high ground to get out. an impossible situation. so we need serious infrastructure impro. and that's sacramento. the rest of my new district goes further north into marysville and yuba city, along the sacramento river, further north, and along the yuba river. again, communities at high risk. serious infrastructure need to be developed. levees need to be improved. upgrade -- upgraded, enhanced. otherwise citizens are at risk just like they were in staten island. this is our responsibility. this is not only a local responsibility and a state responsibility, this is a national responsibility. this is where we become a national community. looking out for each other. providing the basic infrastructure to protect us. we also have infrastructure that's necessary for commerce. our roads, our highways, our internet systems
city, which got ravaged by 9/11. a plane had crashed right in their village. now the storm. steve was pursuing nancy pelosi because we did a story trying to find out how come members of congress can invest in wall street and not in stock, that is related to businesses they are looking at on capitol hill, without having to abide by the rules you and i do in terms of insider trading. that law got changed. the change happened right after. that was just this year. it is a really good question. it is part of what motivates people in the news business. you can have an impact. you feel a lot better about what you are doing when you are working on something important. i can tell you all so i worked in a lot of places in local news in my six years before i got to cbs news and i learned from places i did not agree with their philosophy. there is so much to learn. you find out what you do not want to be part of. "news, we do not want to go out there to make e news. we want to scare people." it is my favorite line. [laughter] i learned so much on that job and other jobs on stations with diffe
. but today, the coal mine is closed down and you have an economically flourishing city. so it is possible to step away from a traditional industrial structure, with public financing and support to go into another direction. therefore we need more money in the european budget. [laughter] mali and congo, i set a lot about our common commitment, and where the values are challenged, wherever terrorism and terrorist groups try to destroy countries, to bring countries to the state of a failed state, as a basis for terrorist groups to export their terrorism, we must act. somalia is a symbol. what is happening in mali is a direct result of the libyan revolution. it is now distributed in the whole region. not only mali. a at a meeting with the king of morocco to tell me that for his country this is one of the biggest risks. this is not only a local conflict. concerning congo, this is an honest risk for the country, the split of the country. congo is another real, bigger challenge. we are willing buyers to accept what is going on, and if they are able to solve the problem, i think we should support
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)